Vocabulary

  • Animation: Animation is the process of making the illusion of motion and the illusion of change by means of the rapid succession of sequential images that minimally differ from each other. The illusion—as in motion pictures in general—is thought to rely on the phi phenomenon and beta movement, but the exact causes are still unclear.
  • Scene: (from Greek σκηνή skēnḗ) may refer to: Scene (drama), an element of a larger fictional work such as a play Scene (filmmaking), a part of action
  • Clip: Video clips are short clips of video, usually part of a longer recording. The term is also more loosely used to mean any short video less than the length of a traditional television program.
  • Timeline: A timeline is a way of displaying a list of events in chronological order, sometimes described as a project artifact. Timelines can use any time scale, depending on the subject and data. Most timelines use a linear scale, in which a unit of distance is equal to a set amount of time.
  • Transition: A film transition is a technique used in the post-production process of film editing and video editing by which scenes or shots are combined. Most commonly this is through a normal cut to the next shot. Most films will also include selective use of other transitions, usually to convey a tone or mood, suggest the passage of time, or separate parts of the story. These other transitions may include dissolves, L cuts, fades (usually to black), match cuts, and wipes.
  • Fade, aka: Disolve: In the post-production process of film editing and video editing, a dissolve is a gradual transition from one image to another. The terms fade-out (also called fade to black) and fade-in are used to describe a transition to and from a blank image. This is in contrast to a cut where there is no such transition. A dissolve overlaps two shots for the duration of the effect, usually at the end of one scene and the beginning of the next, but may be used in montage sequences also. Generally, but not always, the use of a dissolve is held to indicate that a period of time has passed between the two scenes.
  • Tilt: Tilting is a cinematographic technique in which the camera stays in a fixed position but rotates up/down in a vertical plane. Tilting the camera results in a motion similar to someone raising or lowering their head to look up or down. It is distinguished from panning in which the camera is horizontally pivoted left or right.
  • Pan: In cinematography and photography panning means swiveling a still or video camera horizontally from a fixed position. This motion is similar to the motion of a person when they turn their head on their neck from left to right. In the resulting image, the view seems to “pass by” the spectator as new material appears on one side of the screen and exits from the other, although perspective lines reveal that the entire image is seen from a fixed point of view.
  • Dolly: A camera dolly is a wheeled cart or similar device used in filmmaking and television production to create smooth horizontal camera movements. The camera is mounted to the dolly and the camera operator and focus puller or camera assistant usually ride on the dolly to push the dolly back and forth. The camera dolly is generally used to produce images which involve moving the camera toward or away from a subject while a take is bring recorded, a technique known as a “dolly shot.” The dolly grip is the dedicated technician trained to operate the dolly by manually pushing it back and forth.[1]
  • Zoom: To move in on a subject
  • Close-up or closeup in filmmaking, television production, still photography and the comic strip medium is a type of shot, which tightly frames a person or an object. Close-ups are one of the standard shots used regularly with medium shots and long shots (cinematic techniques). Close-ups display the most detail, but they do not include the broader scene. Moving in to a close-up or away from a close-up is a common type of zooming.
  • P.O.V.: Point of View
  • Live Action: The phrase “live action” also occurs within an animation context to refer to non-animated characters: in a live-action/animated film such as Space Jam, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Looney Tunes: Back in Action, or Mary Poppins in which humans and cartoons co-exist, “live-action” characters are the “real” actors, such as Bob Hoskins and Julie Andrews, as opposed to the animated “actors”, such as Roger Rabbit himself.
  • Cel-frame: Traditional animation (or classical animation, cel animation or hand-drawn animation) is an animation technique where each frame is drawn by hand. The technique was the dominant form of animation in cinema until the advent of computer animation.
  • Stop motion (hyphenated stop-motion when used as an adjective) is an animation technique that physically manipulates an object so that it appears to move on its own. The object is moved in small increments between individually photographed frames, creating the illusion of movement when the series of frames is played as a fast sequence. Dolls with movable joints or clay figures are often used in stop motion for their ease of repositioning. Stop motion animation using plasticine is called clay animation or “clay-mation”. Not all stop motion requires figures or models; many stop motion films can involve using humans, household appliances and other things for comedic effect. Stop motion can also use sequential drawing in a similar manner to traditional animation, such as a flip book. Stop motion using objects is sometimes referred to as pixilation or object animation.
  • Clay animation or claymation, sometimes plasticine animation, is one of many forms of stop motion animation. Each animated piece, either character or background, is “deformable”—made of a malleable substance, usually plasticine clay.
  • Inking: The process of finalizing in ink a pencil, hand drawn animation cel
  • Pencil test: After all the drawings are cleaned up, they are then photographed on an animation camera, usually on black and white film stock.[4] Nowadays, pencil tests can be made using a video camera and computer software.
  • Clean-up: To ink up all hand drawn pencil cel drawings – ready for coloring
  • Lip Sync: (short for lip synchronization) is a technical term for matching a speaking or singing person’s lip movements with prerecorded sung or spoken vocals that listeners hear, either through the sound reinforcement system in a live performance or via television, computer or cinema speakers in other cases. The term can refer to any of a number of different techniques and processes, in the context of live performances and audiovisual recordings.
  • Voice-over: (also known as off-camera or off-stage commentary) is a production technique where a voice—that is not part of the narrative (non-diegetic)—is used in a radio, television production, filmmaking, theatre, or other presentations.[1] The voice-over is read from a script and may be spoken by someone who appears elsewhere in the production or by a specialist voice talent. It is usually pre-recorded and placed over the top of a film or video and commonly used in documentaries or news reports to explain information. Voiceover is used in video games and on-hold messages,[2] as well as for announcements and information at events and tourist destinations. It may also be read live for events such as award presentations.
  • Key frame: A key frame in animation and filmmaking is a drawing that defines the starting and ending points of any smooth transition. The drawings are called “frames” because their position in time is measured in frames on a strip of film. A sequence of key frames defines which movement the viewer will see, whereas the position of the key frames on the film, video, or animation defines the timing of the movement. Because only two or three key frames over the span of a second do not create the illusion of movement, the remaining frames are filled with inbetweens.
  • Tween: Inbetweening or tweening is the process of generating intermediate frames between two images to give the appearance that the first image evolves smoothly into the second image. Inbetweens are the drawings between the key frames which help to create the illusion of motion. Inbetweening is a key process in all types of animation.
  • Motion path: The path the animation follows.
  • Motion arc: A path that follows an arcing pah.

Definitions from Wikipedia